Engine 36 Firehouse
1655 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, New York

TEXT Beneath Illustrations

Built: 1913
Architect:
Howard L. Beck
Style:
Arts & Crafts
2014:
1st floor: Looselumber, Inc. (online April 2014).
2nd floor: Home of Louis and Marie Radwan Haremski.
Other Buffalo firehouse designed by Howard L. Beck:
Hook & Ladder No. 12
Other Buffalo firehouses: Chemical No. 5 Firehouse
Fire Engine #2
Engine #15 Fire Station



West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue). Main entrance.
Most distinctive Arts & Crafts style features: Hipped roofs  ...  Extended rafter tails ... Large wooden brackets supporting wide, unenclosed eaves



West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue) .
Extended rafter tails ... Large wooden brackets supporting wide, unenclosed eaves



West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue): Bas-relief firefighters seal



West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue): Stretcher bond brick pattern



West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue) ... City of Buffalo seal ... Scroll buttress



West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue) ... Official City of Buffalo seal



West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue) ... Scroll buttress


West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue) ...
Extended rafter tails ... Large wooden brackets supporting wide, unenclosed eaves




West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue) ... Across the street on Elmwood and Great Arrow: Pierce-Arrow Administration Building


West elevation (on Elmwood Avenue) ...



 
North elevatiion (on Great Arrow Drive)



North elevatiion (on Great Arrow Drive)


North elevatiion (on Great Arrow Drive): Tower where fire hoses were stretched out to dry.



North elevatiion (on Great Arrow Drive)



North elevatiion (on Great Arrow Drive)



North elevatiion (on Great Arrow Drive)


Excerpts from
Three Quirky Homes
By Deandra Modica
Originally published in The Buffalo News on August 6, 2013
(online April 2014)


Countless businesses and homes line Elmwood Avenue, but nothing can compare to the unique home Louis A. and Marie Radwan Haremski have created in the former Engine 36 firehouse.

Since buying the 4,440 square foot firehouse in July 2008, the couple has spent countless hours transforming the first floor into a studio for Louis’ furniture business, Looselumber, Inc., the second floor into a stylish apartment, and the 1913 firehouse exterior back to its original glory. The renovations have continued since they moved in last year.

Living above his shop is both convenient and economical. The Haremskis’ grown children, Edmund and Elise, have also contributed to the renovations. Everything, including the woodwork and tin ceilings, was refinished, refurbished and recreated as a family affair.

The apartment’s main living space on the second floor can be accessed from an elevator, and features a beautiful kitchen, dining room and living room with a cove-light champagne tin ceiling.

After looking over the original blueprints of the firehouse, Louis decided to recreate the building’s original red Arts and Crafts style firehouse doors.

Photos and their arrangement 2014Chuck LaChiusa

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