The History of Buffalo: A Chronology
Buffalo, New York

1946-1970

1664
1679
1689

1721

1722
1759
1774
1775
1780
1785
1786
1788
1789
1790
1791
1792
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1800
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1878
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1881
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1886
1887
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1895
1896
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1900
1901
1902
1903
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1905
1906
1907
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1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1945
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966 1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000

2001
2002

INDEX


1946

All-American Football Conference has its first season. It will merge with the NFL after the 1949 season.




During the war Buffalo had become the center of the aircraft industry, the Seattle of its day, with millions of dollars in federal contracts. and thousands of its workers involved in the production of planes, engines, and their component parts. Buffalo prospered as long as the war continued and the government bought its planes. The end of the war signaled disaster.

In 1943 there were over 40,000 people working at Curtiss-Wright. By September 1945 the number had been reduced to 5,500 and the ripple was felt throughout the whole economy. By Christmas, 1946 there were over 80,000 people, close to fifteen percent of the area work force, without work.

Then, in early 1946, Curtiss-Wright announced that it was closing down almost all of its Buffalo operations. They were moving to Columbus, Ohio. They claimed they had nothing against Buffalo itself. It was simply a matter of space; they didn't need so much of it any more.

1947

Bell Aircraft develops several rocket-powered planes, beginning with the X-1, first aircraft to break the sound barrier when Chuck Yeager flies at 760 mph on October 14.



Film about Buffalo-born Chauncey Olcott, "My Wild Irish Rose," released.


1948

WBEN-TV, Channel 4, The Buffalo Evening News Television Station, begins broadcasting

  • Buffalo Evening News Editor and WBEN President Alfred H. Kirkhofer is the founding father
  • First studios are on the 18th floor of the Hotel Statler
  • Broadcaster and decorated WW II veteran Fred Keller is one of four employees chosen to gather information about how to program and operate a television station. Keller will work fort WBEN until 1962.
  • WBEN televises the consecration of the Rt. Rev. Lauriston Scaife as Episcopal Bishop of WNY on May 13
  • First news reporter and anchor is Ed Dinsmore
  • "The Clue" is television's first live drama series (1948-1953)
  • Ralph Hubbell is the first sportscaster

Source: Vic Baker, "The First Television in Western New York..." in Spring 1998 "Western New York Heritage"

1949  

1950

City of Buffalo-owned Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Larkin Soap Co. Administration Building on Seneca Street is demolished.

Buses replace the last of the Buffalo trolleys. The last trolley run is about July 1950. The old trolley maintenance barn at 459 Forest Ave. is sold to the Teck Collision Company and subsequently will be acquired by the Buffalo Historical Society in 1990 for use in storing its collections.

Buffalo's population peaks at 580,132
               ___________________________________________________________

Willis Haviland Carrier, the man known as "The Father of the Air Conditioning Industry," dies.

Buffalo ranks sixth among cities in steel production. Bethlehem's Lackawanna plant is one of the largest mills in the nation, having an annual steel ingot capacity of 3,600,000 tons.



1951

Buildings erected:


1952

Beginning in 1952, a small yet significant number of Buffalo's industries begin to leave:

  • Spencer-Kellogg, the largest maker of linseed oil products in the United States, announces in January 1952 that it is closing its Buffalo plant. It is, the owner said, fifty years old and out of date. Others followed.

  • Dupont decides that it would build a ten million dollar plant in Ohio to manufacture a product -mylar - that they had developed in Buffalo.

  • National Anilene, now owned by Allied Chemical, had also lost its loyalty to the local community, and announced that it is moving its plant to Virginia to process coal tar products.

  • Hooker Chemical chooses Mississippi over Niagara Falls as the site of a new chlorine plant. The reason, they say, is "a combination of circumstances including cost of land, the labor situation and the cost of doing business in New York State."

Most people, unable to face the reality of the dramatic upheavals that are occurring within the community, fail to grasp the significance of these events. Commentators remain boosterish in the face of discomfiting facts.



1953 Commerce is in even more trouble than industry. The city had long ago lost its historic function as a port of transshipment, and by mid-century most of the processing industries that has at one time provided a diversified and stable economic base has all but disappeared, with lumber, tanning, and soap among them.

Even the beer industry is in trouble. While Buffalonians are drinking more beer than ever, they are drinking less local brew. National companies - Schlitz, Budweiser, and Miller - in a concerted effort to destroy home-based breweries in cities through- out the country, are invading local markets and successfully undercutting local breweries (Annheuser-Busch, for example, opened a local distributorship in Buffalo in 1953). The local industry staggers under this intense pressure from the large national companies. They simply could not compete. Not only do they lack the cash to mount more than regional sales campaigns, but their plant facilities are old and obsolete.

As much as anything, it is their failure to modernize that has done them in. (Buffalo's last brewery, the Iroquois, will close in 1972.) - Source: Mark Goldman, "High Hopes: The Rise and Decline of Buffalo, New York." Pub. by State U. of New York Press, Albany, 1983, p.270



It is announced that the Scajaquada Creek Expressway, a four-lane highway, will be built through Delaware park.


1954

Buildings erected:


1955 October 19, Skyway opened to traffic. Length: 5800 feet. Height: 100 feet. 2005 Traffic volume: 41,500 daily average. Cost to build: $12 million. Total maintenance 1953-2005: $128 million.


1956  


1957 The Allentown Art Festival is founded in 1957 by a group of business owners, residents, working artists and craftspersons



In 1957, the 125tb anniversary of the City of Buffalo, a time capsule is buried on the grounds of the Buffalo Historical Society to be opened in 2032, the 200 anniversary of the City of Buffalo. The capsule contains items reflecting on life in the city in the year 1957.



Believing Sen. Joseph McCarthy's estimates that there are 130 members of the Communist party in Buffalo (he later revises his figures to 39), the House UnAmerican Activities Committee decides to add Buffalo to their list of cities to visit. Their informers have provided them with additional information, and finally in October 1957 the HUAC came to Buffalo.

1958

Bruce M. Shanks (1908-1958), Buffalo Evening News editorial cartoonist, wins the 1958 Pulitzer Prize for his cartoon "The Thinker," published on August 10, 1957,depicting the dilemma of union membership when confronted by racketeering leaders in some labor unions.

Shanks dies in 1980 in Boca Raton, Florida, where he had retired.



The modem invented.

The laser invented


1959

"Wilson Greatbatch did not invent the pacemaker or even the internal pacemaker. These had been invented by others with limited success. HE IS the person most responsible for creating a RELIABLE internal pacemaker. His work to develop and use the lithium iodide cell was genius and has become the standard in the industry." -  Phil Kinecki


    1960

    Bell Aircraft moves to Texas in the 1960s.

    Bell built one of the first American Jets and the first aircraft to break the sound barrier. It also pioneered in the development of the helicopter. Technological changes in the industry, management turnovers, and the high cost of manufacturing in New York State causes the aircraft industry either to close or depart from the region.




    St. Lawrence Seaway:

    President Eisenhower and Queen Elizabeth ceremoniously open the St. Lawrence Seaway making Buffalo an international port. Disappointment reigns when ocean freighters bypasses Buffalo for western lake ports.

    The impact on Buffalo is immediate. Oceangoing vessels carrying goods both to and from the Midwest now bypass Buffalo. After stopping at all the Great Lakes ports - Duluth. Chicago. Detroit. and Cleveland - they will exit Lake Erie, well before they even get to Buffalo, pass through the Welland Canal into Lake Ontario, then continue across that lake and onto the Seaway to Montreal. Buffalo's long-dreaded nightmare has finally come to pass. With no reason for ships bound either for the ocean from the West or from the ocean to the West to ever come to Buffalo, the city sits bypassed at the end of a long dead-end street.

    Suddenly a whole range of waterfront industries - boat companies, ship chandlers, ship repairers, and shipbuilders - begin to go.

    The grain industry, consisting primarily of grain storage and the manufacture of flour, suffer more than anything. Since the middle of the nineteenth century Buffalo has been the grain storage capital of the world, harboring millions of tons of Midwestern grain in its internationally renowned grain elevators. But now, as increasing amounts of grain are shipped to Montreal via the Seaway, Buffalo's significance as a port of storage is sharply and quickly eroded.

    Flour milling also faces hard times, and mills and elevators are closing throughout the 1960s.



    Growth of the Suburbs: Whites in Buffalo, like those in cities all over the country,are taking advantage of generous federal subsidies and moving into the suburbs.

    Between 1950 and 1960 over eighty thousand white Buffalonians - close to twenty percent of the 1950 population - move out of the city.

    At the same time the city's black population is mushrooming; from 36,645 in 1950 to over 70,000 ten years later.

    Annual report - Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority

    1961  

    1962 A modern architectural addition to the Albright Art Gallery is donated by Seymour Knox. The name is changed to Albright-Knox in recognition of his donation of numerous art works to the art gallery and a donation of $1,000,000 toward the expansion of the building. The balance of the $1,700,000 addition is raised by a fund drive.



    The American Shipbuilding Company closes down, the last vestige of an industry which has been in Buffalo since 1812.


    1963  


    1964  Buildings erected:

    1965 Schools Court case: A class action suit is begun by a group of parents seeking to correct racial imbalance in the Buffalo Public Schools. Buffalo is adjudged as having the 4tb most segregated school system in the North. Student reading scores are abysmal and African-American students lagged by 2 to 5 years behind white peers.

    Federal Judge John Curtin says that his decision to integrate is influenced by arguments made in 1842 by the National Conference of Colored Men organized by Henry Moxley, an escaped slave who settled in Buffalo and became a prosperous businessman.

    The education of black children is improved such that by 1988, the schools will be racially balanced, and the teaching staff will include a minority representation of 27% of elementary school teachers and 16% of high school teachers.


    1966

    Five flour mills are shut down


    Buildings erected:

    1967

    Kensington Expressway opens on August 15, 1967.



    State University of NY Trustees vote unanimously in favor of Amherst as the site for expansion of SUNY at Buffalo (UB).



    The size of the black community had grown from 40,000 in the late 1950s to over 100,000 by Independence Day, 1967. In the meantime, only two hundred units of new housing had been built. The riots were an expression of black rage takes the form of several days of rioting.


    Buildings erected:


    1968 The computer mouse invented.

    Governor Nelson Rockefeller breaks ground for SUNY at Buffalo's Amherst campus.


    In the summer of 1969 antiwar activities were taken directly into Buffalo's residential West Side, where several students, already found guilty of draft evasion, sought asylum in a Unitarian church on Elmwood Avenue. Finally, after several tense days of efforts by the minister to mediate between the students and the federal agents outside the church, the Feds stormed the church and forcibly arrested the students within, who at that point became known as "The Buffalo Nine."


    1969

    1970

    Protests against the Viet Nam War sweep through the college campuses across the country, culminating on May 4th when four students at Kent State University are shot to death by National Guard troops.

    UB students and city and campus police clash in February 1970. On February 25, 18 persons are arrested, 12 others hospitalized with injuries, and at least two dozen campus buildings are damaged.

    This UB experience is influential in the design of the new Amherst campus. Other than its enormity, what will most distinguish the design of the new SUNY AB campus from the old UB campus will be its sudden and dramatic departure from the idea of centrality and enclosure that not only had dictated the form of the Main Street campus, but indeed had been the dominant concept in the design of universities throughout the world since the Middle Ages. F or, on the new SUNY AB campus, there are no quadrangles, no fountain areas, no plazas, no enclosed courtyards - no places and no spaces, in other words, where the individuals who composed the college community could come together.

    No other campus of the state university system is so designed.


    Sports:
    • St. Bonaventure's Basketball Team enter the NCAA's Final Four, but without injured player Bob Lanier (Bennett High School alumnus), their hopes for a national title are dashed.
    • Before a crowd of more than seven-thousand at Memorial Auditorium on October 14, the Buffalo Braves Basketball Team, owned by businessman Paul Snyder, defeat the Cleveland Cavaliers in their first game.
    • Buffalo Sabres play their first game in the NHL.
    • To make room for the anticipated large crowds that would attend professional basketball and hockey games, the roof of Memorial Auditorium is raised and a balcony of orange seats is installed. The auditorium's capacity is increased by about five thousand seats.
    • In professional baseball, in War Memorial Stadium in June., the Buffalo Bisons play their last game.



    By 1970 Buffalo's population has sunk to 462,000 from its 1950 high of 532,000. In 10 years, it will have shrunk to 357, 000.

    See also:



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