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Jesus - Iconography in Art and Architecture


Iconography: Study of the symbolic, often religious, meaning of objects, persons, or events depicted in works of art
Research contributions by Gregory L. Witul

Agony in the Garden

Alpha and Omega

Anointed by a Sinful Woman

Ascension

Baptism (by John the Baptist)

Beatitudes

Blind Man, Heals a

Cana, Marriage at (Miracle)

Carpentry, Learning

Chalice

Children, with

Chi Ro

Christogram

Christ the Teacher icon

Crown of thorns

Crucifix

Crucifixion

Deesis

Epiphany (Magi)

Fish

Flight Into Egypt

Garden in Gethsemane


Good Shepherd, Christ as the

Grapes

Holy Communion

Holy Family


ICXC

IHS

Infant of Prague

INRI

Jairus' Daughter (Miracle)

Jerusalem, Entry into (Palm Sunday)

Lamb, Sacrificial

Last Supper

Loaves and Fishes, Miracle of

Magi Visit Infant Jesus

Mandorla, Christ in

Mary and Martha, Jesus With

Nativity / Shepherds

Palm Sunday
Pantocrator

Peacock

Pelican and chicks

Presentation of the of the Infant Jesus in the Temple

PX

Resurrection

Sacred Heart

Sacrificial Lamb

Sermon on the Mount

Shepherds Visit Baby Jesus (Nativity)

Stations of the Cross

Stigmata

Te Deum

Temple, Found in the (age 12)

Three nails

Transfiguration

Trinity

Wheat

Woman of Samaria at the Well

Agony in the Garden According to all four Gospels, immediately after the Last Supper, Jesus took a walk to pray in the Garden of Gethsemane, accompanied by St. Peter, St. John and St. James the Greater, whom he asked to stay awake and pray.

Luke 22:39-46

Matthew 26:36-46

Mark 14:32-42

John 18:4
Stained glass: Holy Angels RC Church
Alpha and Omega "I am the alpha and the omega": an appellation of God in the Book of Revelation (verses 1:8, 21:6, and 22:13). Its meaning is found in the fact that Alpha  and Omega are respectively the first and last letters of the Classical (Ionic) Greek alphabet. This would be similar to referring to someone in English as "the A to Z".

Symbol for Christ: This phrase is interpreted by many Christians to mean that Jesus existed from eternity (as the second person of the Trinity), and will exist eternally.
Mosaic: Delaware Avenue Baptist Church



Sculpture: Episcopal Church of the Ascension On 1873 marble baptismal font


Stained glass:

Westminster Presbyterian Church

Holy Angels RC Church

Murals:

St. Casimir's RC Church
Ascension Mark 16:14-19
14
Later Jesus appeared to the Eleven [apostles] as they were eating; he rebuked them for their lack of faith and their stubborn refusal to believe those who had seen him after he had risen...
19 After the Lord Jesus had spoken to them, he was taken up into heaven and he sat at the right hand of God.

Acts 1:1-14
10 They were looking intently up into the sky as he was going, when suddenly two men [interpreted as angels] dressed in white stood beside them.
11
"Men of Galilee," they said, "why do you stand here looking into the sky? This same Jesus, who has been taken from you into heaven, will come back in the same way you have seen him go into heaven."

The event took place on the mount of Olives, east of Jerusalem, between Bethany and the Holy City (Luke 24:50, Acts 1:12) and was accompanied by the appearance of two angels (Acts 1:10). The event took place forty days after the resurrection (Acts 1:3).

The Catholic and Orthodox traditional view is that Mary was also present at the Ascension, following her mention in Acts 1:14.
Stained glass:

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Saints Peter and Paul RC Church

Trinity Episcopal Church

Holy Angels RC Church

Annunciation RC Church

Assumption RC Church
Baptism of Jesus


Matthew 3:13-17 (New International Version):
13 Then Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan to be baptized by John.
14 But John tried to deter him, saying, "I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?"
15 Jesus replied, "Let it be so now; it is proper for us to do this to fulfill all righteousness." Then John consented.
16 As soon as Jesus was baptized, he went up out of the water. At that moment heaven was opened, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and lighting on him.
17 And a voice from heaven said, "This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased."

Depictions: Jesus, John, Holy Spirit as a dove and the voice of God the Father

The "official" way to become a Christian is to be baptized.  Baptists practice baptism by immersion in a small pool, as opposed to affusion or sprinkling over a baptismal font  in most other Christian denominations.

See also: St. John the Baptist
Stained glass:

Grace Episcopal Church, Lockport

Saints Peter and Paul RC Church (Mazur)

St. Joseph's RC Cathedral

Blessed Trinity RC Church

Westminster Presbyterian Church

Our Lady of Victory RC Basilica

Saints Peter and Paul RC Church (Andrle)

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Annunciation RC Church

Assumption RC Church

Icons:
 
Church of the Intercession, Kizhi, Russia

Paintings:

Catalonian National Art Museum, Barcelona, Spain


Sculpture:
St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City

Beatitudes   Stained glass: Westminster Presbyterian Church
Cana, Marriage at John 2:1-11: Jesus turns water into wine Stained glass:

Westminster Presbyterian Church

St. Joseph RC Cathedral

St. Stanislaus RC Church
Chalice


Children, Christ with Luke 18:16, "Let the little children come to me, and do not stop them, for it is to such as these that the kingdom of God belongs."

Mark 10:13-16
Stained glass:

First Presbyterian Church, Lockport

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd Chapel

Westminster Presbyterian Church

St. John's Grace Episcopal Church

Our Lady of Victory RC Basilica

Corpus Christi RC Church

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Annunciation RC Church

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church

St. John Kanty RC Church
Christogram Combination of letters that forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, traditionally used as a Christian symbol.
See IHS, ICXCPX below.

Crown of thorns Woven thorn branches placed on Jesus Christ before his crucifixion.

Matthew 27:29: And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews!

Mark 15:17  ........   John 19:2, 5

King Louis IX bought what is believed by many Christians to be the Jesus' crown  of thorns and built Sainte Chapelle to house it.

The crown of thorns is usually found on the Sacred Heart of Jesus (below) depicti

Sculpture:

Buffalo Religious Arts Museum/St. Francis Xavier RC Church

St. John Kanty RC Church
Crucifix See Illustrated Architecture Dictionary: Cross  
Crucifixion

According to Matthew 27:54-55, the following were present at the Crucifixion:

  • Mary Magdalene
  • Mary the mother of James (the Less) and Joses
  • Mother of Zebedee's children.
  • Roman centurions

Salome: Mark 15:40 adds Salome to those present at the Crucifixion.

Mary, mother,of Jesus: In John 19: 26-27, the evangelist adds, "When Jesus therefore saw His mother, and the disciple whom He loved standing by, He said to His mother, "Woman, behold your son!" 27 Then He said to the disciple, "Behold your mother!" And from that hour that disciple took her to his own home." (The disciple is interpreted as John.)

St. Mary Magdalene is sometimes depicted with the cross on which Jesus was crucified on Golgotha and with Adam's skull which tradition holds was also buried in Golgotha ("the place of the skull). 

See also:  cross ..... Stations of the Cross ..... stigmata

Stained glass:

Saints Peter and Paul RC Church

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Westminster Presbyterian Church

St. Joseph's RC Cathedral

St. John's Grace Episcopal Church Mary and John at the foot of the cross

St. John the Evangelist RC Church

Our Lady of Victory RC Basilica

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Holy Angels RC Church

Church of Saint Joan of Arc, Rouen, France

Sculpture:

Blessed Trinity RC Church

St. Casimir's RC Church

Catalonian National Art Museum, Barcelona, Spain     3 examples

St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City

Icons:

Church of Santa Anna, Barcelona, Spain

Church of the Intercession, Kizhi, Russia
Deesis
"In Byzantine art, and later Eastern Orthodox art generally, the DeŽsis or Deisis, is a traditional iconic representation of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator: enthroned, carrying a book, and flanked by the Virgin Mary and St. John the Baptist, and sometimes other saints and angels.

 "Mary and John, and any other figures, are shown facing towards Christ with their hands raised in supplication on behalf of humanity.

"The presence of Mary and John, and other figures, is one of the differences with the Western Christ in Majesty, where the Four Evangelists and/or their symbols are more commonly included around Christ. The Deesis composition is also commonly found in the West, especially those parts of Italy under Byzantine influence, but also the rest of Europe." - Wikipedia: Deesis (online Dec. 2014)
Mosaics:

Epiphany, Magi "To manifest" or "to show"

Christian festival, observed on January 6, commemorating the manifestation of Christ to the gentiles in the persons of the Magi; Twelfth-day.

Matthew 2:1-12

Luke 2:1-20

Because three gifts were recorded, there are traditionally said to have been three Magi.
Painting: Annunciation RC Church


Stained glass:

Grace Episcopal Church, Lockport

St. Joseph RC Cathedral

First Presbyterian Church, Lockport

Westminster Presbyterian Church

Westminster Presbyterian Church

St. Joseph's RC Cathedral

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd

St. John the Evangelist RC Church

Trinity Episcopal Church

Louvre, Paris

Fish
In Greek, the phrase, "Jesus Christ, Son of God Savior," is "Iesous Christos Theou Yios Soter." The first letters of each of these Greek words, when put together, spell "ichthys," the Greek word for "fish" (ICQUS ).

Used by Early Christians as a secret symbol. The ichthys is seen in 1st-century catacombs in Rome. According to tradition, ancient Christians, during their persecution by the Roman Empire in the first few centuries after Christ, used the fish symbol to mark meeting places and tombs, or to distinguish friends from foes.

Because of the story of the miracle of the loaves and fishes, the fish symbolized, too, the Eucharist

The "Jesus Fish" has become an icon of modern Christianity. Today, it can be seen as a decal or emblem on the rear of automobiles or as pendants or necklaces as a sign to the world that the owner is a Christian.

The fish has also been used to symbolize Pisces, the Zodiac sign.

Sgraffito:

Assumption RC Church
Flight Into Egypt Matthew 2: 13-23 Painting: Annunciation RC Church

Sgraffito:
Assumption RC Church
Garden of Gethsemane / Mount of Olives Mark 14:32-42 (Gethsemane)

Luke 22:39-46 (Mount of Olives)

Matthew 26:36-46

Gethsemane: the bottom of the slope of Mt. of Olives

Parallels the Garden of Eden where the first sin was committed. In Gethsemane Jesus accepts that he will die for the sins of mankind.

Depictions:
Sleeping apostles / Jesus kneeling
Stained glass:

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Buffalo Religious Arts Center/St. Francis Xavier RC Church

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church

St. Stanislaus RC Church
Good Shepherd, Christ as Psalm 23

John 10:11:  "I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep."

"The Good Shepherd is one of the oldest Christian symbols. In the catacombs of Rome there is a Good Shepherd picture painted in the fourth century A.D., probably just before Emperor Constantine officially recognized Christianity." - Nola Huse Tutag, Discovering Stained Glass in Detroit, Wayne State University Press, 1987

Christ depicted with a flock of sheep
Stained glass:

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd

Plymouth Methodist Church / Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum

St. John's Grace Episcopal Church

First Presbyterian Church, LOCKPORT

Unitarian Universalist Church

Trinity Episcopal Church

Baker Memorial United Methodist Church, EAST AURORA

St. Stanislaus RC Church


Sculpture:

St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City

Grapes


Holy Communion Also called the Eucharist and Blessed Sacrament

A commemoration of the Last Supper below.

Takes the form of a host in Roman Catholicism.
 Stained glass:

Annunciation RC Church
ICXC Traditional abbreviation of the Greek words for "Jesus Christ"

In Eastern Christianity, the most widely used Christogram (above)
Murals:

St. Casimir's RC Church
IHS Christogram: IHS are the first 3 letters in Jesus' name in Greek: iota, eta, and sigma.

(A Christogram is a monogram or combination of letters that forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, traditionally used as a Christian symbol.)

Also, IHS in Latin stands for "In Hoc Sanctis," which means "In this sacred place" or "In His Service" or "I Have Suffered."

This is a Christogram (above)
Stained glass:

First Presbyterian Church, Lockport

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Buffalo Religious Arts Center /St. Francis Xavier RC Church On Jesus' robe

Baker Memorial United Methodist Church, EAST AURORA

Sgraffito:

Assumption RC Church

Furniture:


St. Stephen Walbrook


Infant of Prague

The original Infant of Prague is a statue of Jesus Christ as a child. It is 18 1/2 inches tall (47 cm) and is made of wax on a wooden core. It is kept at the Church of Our Lady of Victory Mala Strana, Prague, in the Czech Republic.

The statue has its origins in the early 17th century in Spain. Maria Manrique de Lara, a Spanish princess, was going to far-away Prague to be married to Czech nobleman Vojtech of Pernstejn. Maria's mother, Isabella, gave her daughter the statue as a wedding gift. Later, Maria gave it to her own daughter Polyxena as a wedding gift. The statue was later given as a gift to a convent of the Discalced Carmelites near the church in Prague where the statue is now kept.

In 1631 the Protestant Swedes sacked the city of Prague and the Infant of Prague statue was taken from its place of honor and thrown onto a rubbish heap behind the altar, its hands broken off. It was forgotten for seven years before Father Cyril a Matre Dei found it and raised money to repair it. The statue became associated with a number of miracles, and also with the protection of Prague from the Swedes.

The Infant of Prague statue has historically been kept dressed in vestments marking the status of Jesus as a Priest and King. Grateful petitioners to the Child Jesus have given the statue many sets of lovely and elaborate gowns. Currently there are 70 gowns for the statue.

- N. I. Annakindt, The Story of the Infant of Prague

Sculpture:

Buffalo Religious Art Center Lace gowns

Buffalo Religious Arts Center


Murals:

St. Casimir's RC Church
INRI INRI is an acronym of the Latin inscription IESVS∑NAZARENVS∑REX∑IVD∆ORVM (Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum), which translates to English as "Jesus the Nazarene, King of the Jews."

In
John19:19-20, the inscription is explained:
"And Pontius Pilate wrote a title, and put it on the cross. And the writing was JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING OF THE JEWS. This title then read many of the Jews
: for the place where Jesus was crucified was nigh to the city: and it was written in Hebrew, and Greek, and Latin."

This is a Christogram (above)
 Assumption RC Church
Jairus' Daughter Luke 8: 40-42, 49-56:
53 They laughed at him, knowing that she was dead.
[54] But he took her by the hand and said, "My child, get up!"
Stained glass: St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral
Jesus Anointed by a Sinful Woman Luke 7:36-50
37When a woman who had lived a sinful life in that town learned that Jesus was eating at the Pharisee's house, she brought an alabaster jar of perfume,

38
and as she stood behind him at his feet weeping, she began to wet his feet with her tears. Then she wiped them with her hair, kissed them and poured perfume on them.

The "sinful woman"is sometimes identified in tradition as Mary Magdalene, but there is no textual evidence for this.
Stained glass:

Our Lady of Victory RC Basilica

St. Louis RC Church

Annunciation RC Church
Jesus Heals a Blind Man Mark 8:22-25

John 9:1-7

List - Healing Miracles of Jesus
 Stained glass:

Assumption RC Church
Jesus Learning Carpentry (from Joseph) / The Holy Family No direct evidence in the Bible

Depictions: The boy Jesus often is carving a cross.
Stained glass:

St. John's Grace Episcopal Church

St. Joseph RC Cathedral

Westminster Presbyterian Church

Corpus Christi RC Church

Assumption RC Church

St. Stanislaus RC Church
Jesus Teaching in the Temple Luke 2:39-52: 12-year-old Jesus teaches in the Jerusalem Temple Stained glass:

Felician Sisters  Convent Chapel

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd

St. John's Grace Episcopal Church

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd

Westminster Presbyterian Church

Our Lady of Victory RC Basilica

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Holy Angels RC Church

Baker Memorial United Methodist Church, EAST AURORA


Lamb, sacrificial Lamb is symbolic of the shepherd and his flock and also of sacrifice. See the Good Shepherd above.

Jesus is sometimes depicted as a sacrificial lamb.
Sculpture:
Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Church of Santa Anna

Stained glass: Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Sgraffito:

Assumption RC Church
Last Supper The final meal that Jesus Christ shared with his disciples before his arrest and eventual crucifixion. The consecration of bread and a cup within the rite recalls the moment at the Last Supper when Jesus gave his disciples bread, saying, "This is my body", and wine, saying, "This is my blood."

Matthew 26: 17-35
Stained glass:

St. John the Evangelist RC Church

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Trinity Episcopal Church

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Annunciation RC Church

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church


Icon:

Hellenic Orthodox Church of the Annunciation
Loaves and fishes, Miracle of Matthew 14:13-21 Stained glass:
St. John's Grace Episcopal Church

Westminster Presbyterian Church

St. Joseph RC Cathedral

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral
Mandorla

Mary and Martha, Jesus With Luke 7:36-50
Stained glass:

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Trinity Episcopal Church
Nativity / Shepherds Luke 2:8-17 Stained glass:

Our Lady of Victory RC Basilica Apse window

Our Lady of Victory RC Basilica Clerestory window

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Holy Angels RC Church

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Assumption RC Church
Palm Sunday Jesus' Entry into Jerusalem

Symbolizes victory over death
Stained glass:

Westminster Presbyterian Church

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Episcopal Church of the Ascension
Pantocrator, Pantokrator, Christ Pantocrator Artwork of Christ holding the gospel book that dominates the center of the dome of a church showing him as almighty God, Lord of the Universe. In his left hand, Christ holds the New Testament, usually a closed book with a richly decorated cover featuring the Cross, representing the Gospels.  

The icon depicts Christ fully frontal with a somewhat melancholy and stern aspect.
Sometimes, on each side of Christ's halo are Greek letters: IC and XC (the Christogram ICXC for "Jesus Christ").

With his
raised  right hand he makes the gesture of teaching or of blessing.

(An icon where Christ has an open book is called "Christ the Teacher," a variant of the Pantocrator).

The Pantokrator is largely an Eastern Orthodox theological conception; it is less common in Western (Roman) Catholicism and largely unknown to most Protestants.

Painting:

New Cathedral of Saint Andrew, Patra, Greece

Cemetery Chapel, Olympia, Greece


Buffalo Religious Art Center

Hellenic Orthodox Church of the Annunciation

Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery
Goritsy, Russia


Mosaics:

Church on Spilled Blood, St. Petersburg, Russia

3 mosaics in Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey

Murals:

St. Casimir's RC Church

Mosque of Christ of the Light, Toledo, Spain
Peacock


Pelican and chicks Just as a pelican mother pecks its own breast for blood to feed her young, Jesus sacrificed his blood for mankind.

Depictions: Pelican mother feeding her chicks
Sculpture:

St. Ann RC Church

St. Luke's Roman Catholic Church/St. Luke's Mission of Mercy

St. Stanislaus RC Church

Stained glass:

Annunciation RC Church

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

St. Joseph's RC Cathedral

Trinity Episcopal Church


Sgraffito:

Assumption RC Church
Presentation of the of the infant Jesus in the Temple Luke 2:22-39 Stained glass:

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd

St. Joseph RC Cathedral

Our Lady of Victory RC Basilica

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Holy Angels RC Church

Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Assumption RC Church
PX Chi Rho (pronunciation):
"The Chi Rho is one of the earliest christograms used by Christians. It is formed by superimposing the first two letters in the Greek spelling of the word Christ

Although not technically a cross, the Chi Rho invokes the crucifixion of Jesus as well as symbolizing his status as the Christ. There is early evidence of the Chi Rho symbol on Christian Rings of the third century." - Wikipedia: Chi Rho

(A Christogram is a monogram or combination of letters that forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, traditionally used as a Christian symbol.)
Stained glass:

First Presbyterian Church, Lockport

Holy Angels RC Church


Mosaic: Delaware Avenue Baptist Church


Sculpture:  Episcopal Church of the Ascension

Murals:   St. Casimir's RC Church
Resurrection Matthew 28:1-10 (An angel tells "Mary Magdalene and the other Mary" that Jesus "has risen.")

Mark 16:1-8 (A young man dressed in a white robe tells "Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome that Jesus "has risen.")

Luke 24:1-12 (2 angels tell Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James that Jesus has risen")

John 20 (Jesus speaks to Mary)

Christians annually celebrate the resurrection of Jesus at Easter, although There is no scriptural basis for this.
Stained glass:

St. Joseph's RC Cathedral

Saints Peter and Paul RC Church

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd

St. John the Evangelist RC Church

Trinity Episcopal Church LaFarge

Trinity Episcopal Church Tiffany

Saints Peter and Paul RC Church

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Baker Memorial United Methodist Church, EAST AURORA     Tiffany

Assumption RC Church







Mosaic:

Church on Spilled Blood, St. Petersburg, Russia  Exterior

Church on Spilled Blood, St. Petersburg, Russia Interior

Sacred Heart of Jesus "Flaming heart shining with divine light, pierced by the lance-wound, surrounded by a crown of thorns, surmounted by a cross and bleeding. Sometimes the image is over Jesus' body with his wounded hands pointing at the heart. The wounds and crown of thorns allude to the manner of Jesus' death, while the fire represents the transformative power of love." - Wikipedia

The origin of this devotion in its modern form is derived from a French Roman Catholic nun, Marguerite Marie Alacoque, who said she learned the devotion from Jesus during a mystical experience.
Painting: Blessed Trinity RC Church



Sculpture:

Buffalo Religious Art Center

Assumption RC Church



Stained glass:

Felician Sisters Convent Chapel

With two angels

Felician Sisters Convent Chapel
With St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

St. Joseph RC Cathedral
Sermon on the Mount
Matthew 5-7
Stained glass:

Westminster Presbyterian Church

Lafayette Presbyterian Church

Grace Episcopal Church, Lockport

Parkside Lutheran Church

Shepherds Visit Infant Jesus See: Nativity/Shepherds above  
Stations of the Cross Wikipedia: Stations of the Cross (or Way of the Cross; in Latin, Via Crucis; also called the Via Dolorosa or Way of Sorrows, or simply, The Way) refers to the depiction of the final hours (or Passion) of Jesus, and the devotion commemorating the Passion.

The tradition as chapel devotion began with St. Francis of Assisi and extended throughout the Roman Catholic Church in the medieval period. It is less often observed in the Anglican and Lutheran churches. It may be done at any time, but is most commonly done during the Season of Lent, especially on Good Friday and on Friday evenings during Lent.


Events:
1. The condemnation of Jesus by Pilate ((see Matthew 27:15-26; Mark 15:6-15; Luke 2:17-25; John 18:38-40, 19:4-16););

2. Jesus' acceptance of the cross (see John 19:17);

3. His first fall;

4. The encounter with his mother; (John 19:25-26)

5. Simon of Cyrene helping Jesus (the Gospels, however, place this event at the beginning of the Via Dolorosa; see Matthew 27:32; Mark 15:21; Luke 23:26);

6. Veronica wiping Jesus' face (NOT in the bible);

7. His second fall;

8. The encounter with the women of Jerusalem (see Luke 23:27-31);

9. His third fall;

10. Jesus being stripped of his garments (see Matthew 27:28);

11. The crucifixion;

12. Jesus' death (see Matthew 27:45-56; Mark 15:33-41; Luke 23:44-49; John 19:30);

13. Jesus' removal from the cross; and

14. The burial of Jesus (see Matthew 27:57-61; Mark 15:42-47; Luke 23:50-56; John 19:38-42).
Sculpture:

Felician Sisters Convent Chapel #1 Jesus Before Pilate

Our Lady of Victory Basilica


Stained glass:

Buffalo Religious Arts Center /St. Francis Xavier RC Church Stations 1-8

Assumption RC Church Station #3


Painting:

Buffalo Religious Art Center



Mosaic:

Church on Spilled Blood, ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA  Station #5
Stigmata stig MAH ta

Five wounds inflicted during the crucifixion: hands, feet, side.

For examples in art, see Saint Francis of Assisi
Painting:

Holy Angels RC Church

St. Luke's Mission of Mercy

Catalonian National Art Museum, Barcelona, Spain

__________
Sculpture:

Felician Sisters Chapel

Cluny Museum, Paris, France

________
Stained glass:

Corpus Christi RC Church

Teacher, Christ the  Icon.

Similar to Christ Pantocrator (above) , but with an open book.
Icon:

Buffalo Religious Art Center

Hellenic Orthodox Church of the Annunciation

Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery
Goritsy, Russia
Te Deum
"Te Deum Laudamus"  - "We praise You, O God." See the Latin  and English texts on Wikipedia (June 2011).

The "Te Deum" or "Te Deum Laudamus" is an early Christian hymn of praise, based on Nicene Creed, dating from the fourth century. It has been in use in the morning prayers of the church since at least the ninth century.  

The usual representation of Christ in a stained glass "Te Deum Window" is that of Christ the King seated in heaven  He is surrounded by Angels, Cherubim and Seraphim, with instruments of praise and smoking censers of incense. They represent different races.

Stained glass:

St. John's Grace Episcopal Church


First Presbyterian Church United, SYRACUSE, NY
Three nails 3 nails symbolize the Crucifixion. They are three in number because two nails were used to secure Christ's Hands, and a third was used to secure His Feet.

The 3 nails are often combined with other symbols, such as they are in the Jesuit seal -- the letters IHS (above) with the three nails underneath, all surmounted by a Cross.
Sgraffito:
Assumption RC Church
Transfiguration of Christ Mark  9:2-7:
2 And after six days Jesus taketh with him
Peter (above), and James (above), and John (above), and leadeth them up into an high mountain apart by themselves: and he was transfigured before them.
3 And his raiment became shining, exceeding white as snow; so as no fuller on earth can white them.
4 And there appeared unto them Elias with
Moses (above): and they were talking with Jesus.
...
7 And there was a cloud that overshadowed them: and a voice came out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear him. 8 And suddenly, when they had looked round about, they saw no man any more, save Jesus only with themselves.
Stained glass:

St. Paul Episcopal Cathedral

Trinity Episcopal Church

Annunciation RC Church

Icons:

Church of the Intercession, KIZHI RUSSIA


Trinity The Trinity consists of three Persons: God (often a voice; father), Jesus (son), Spirit (dove)

Matthew 3:16, 28:19

Depictions: 3 intertwining circles
Sculpture: Blessed Trinity RC Church

Blessed Trinity RC Church

Blessed Trinity RC Church


Painting: Buffalo Religious Arts Center
Wheat


Woman of Samaria at the Well John 4:4-42

See also:


Photos and their arrangement © 2009 Chuck LaChiusa
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